Dr Stephen Blumenfeld

Dr Stephen Blumenfeld

Dr Stephen Blumenfeld

Director - Centre for Labour, Employment & Work | Victoria University of Wellington

Dr Stephen Blumenfeld is Director of the Centre for Labour, Employment and Work (formerly Industrial Relations Centre) at Victoria University of Wellington in New Zealand, a position he has held for the past 10 years. In that capacity, he has presented to employment relations practitioners on wages and conditions contained in the CLEW’s collective agreements database as part of its annual series of Employment Agreement seminars, held throughout New Zealand.

Dr Blumenfeld is also responsible for dissemination of specific research findings through academic conferences organized by CLEW, including the biennial Conference on Labour, Employment and Work in New Zealand, which brings together researchers with an interest in labour markets, employment markets and the nature of paid work in New Zealand, and for publication of the CLEW’s quarterly CLEWed In (formerly The Employment Agreement) newsletter, its annual Employment Agreements: Bargaining Trends & Employment Law Update, and various research working papers.

Dr Blumenfeld has a thorough knowledge of and extensive experience researching and working in employment relations. He has researched and published widely on numerous aspects of this subject area, both within New Zealand and internationally, for more than two decades. As a member of the Editorial Boards of both Labour & Industry and the New Zealand Journal of Employment Relations and as a periodic reviewer for several international journals in the field of employment relations, Dr Blumenfeld is familiar with a wide range of research and evaluative methods, many of which he has used in his own research.

His own particular research interests include:
• the economics of collective bargaining and trade unions,
• employment law and labour policy,
• international and comparative employment relations,
• regulating employment in global commodity chains,
• decent work and job quality, and
• precarious and insecure working arrangements.